Reminder of eight-step export routine

Following the end of the Brexit transition period, the process for exporting goods to the EU mirrors the process for all other international destinations.

Businesses, especially those that only trade with EU should by now be aware of the rules and be working accordingly. Businesses can make customs declarations themselves or hire a third party such as a courier, freight forwarder or customs agent to do the paperwork.

HMRC lists the following eight-steps that should be considered when exporting goods:

  1. Check if you need to follow this process. The process listed below should be if you're moving goods permanently from: England, Wales or Scotland (Great Britain) to a country outside the UK or from Northern Ireland to a country outside the UK and the EU. There are different rules for goods that move between Great Britain and Northern Ireland or between Northern Ireland and the EU.
  2. Check the rules for exporting your goods.
  3. Get your business ready to export. This includes ensuring you have an Economic Operator Registration and Identification (EORI) number.
  4. Decide who will make export declarations and transport the goods
  5. Classify your goods.
  6. Prepare the invoice and other documentation for your goods.
  7. Get your goods through customs.
  8. Keep invoices and records.

Financial support for exporters

There is a special financial support targeted specifically at exporters.  This is in addition to the package of government-backed and guaranteed loans and other measures designed to support businesses coping with the financial effects of Coronavirus (COVID-19).

UK Export Finance (UKEF) is the export credit agency and a ministerial department of the UK government. The UKEF helps UK companies by providing insurance to exporters and guarantees to banks to share the risks of providing export finance. In addition, it can make loans to overseas buyers of goods and services from the UK that can protect UK exporters facing delayed payments or transit restrictions.

At this crucial time, the following help may be available from UKEF:

  • If your business is facing disruption due to late payments, UKEF can help ease cash flow constraints by guaranteeing bank loans through its Export Working Capital Scheme
  • If you are concerned about getting paid, UKEF offers an export insurance policy that can help you recover the costs of fulfilling an order that is terminated by events outside your control
  • UKEF can also support finance for overseas buyers through the Direct Lending Facility scheme, so they can continue to buy your goods and services
  • UKEF has over £4 billion of capacity to support UK firms exporting to China, as well as significant capacity across other markets affected by Coronavirus (COVID-19) to help cover these risks.