Tax Diary July/August 2019

1 July 2019 – Due date for Corporation Tax due for the year ended 30 September 2018.

6 July 2019 – Complete and submit forms P11D return of benefits and expenses and P11D(b) return of Class 1A NICs.

19 July 2019 – Pay Class 1A NICs (by the 22 July 2019 if paid electronically).

19 July 2019 – PAYE and NIC deductions due for month ended 5 July 2019. (If you pay your tax electronically the due date is 22 July 2019)

19 July 2019 – Filing deadline for the CIS300 monthly return for the month ended 5 July 2019. 

19 July 2019 – CIS tax deducted for the month ended 5 July 2019 is payable by today.

1 August 2019 – Due date for Corporation Tax due for the year ended 31 October 2018.

19 August 2019 – PAYE and NIC deductions due for month ended 5 August 2019. (If you pay your tax electronically the due date is 22 August 2019)

19 August 2019 – Filing deadline for the CIS300 monthly return for the month ended 5 August 2019. 

19 August 2019 – CIS tax deducted for the month ended 5 August 2019 is payable by today.

Rent-a-room scheme

The rent-a-room scheme is a set of special rules designed to help homeowners who rent-a-room in their home. The current tax-free threshold of £7,500 per year has been in place since 6 April 2016.

The relief only applies to the letting of furnished accommodation and is used when one bedroom is rented out in a furnished house to a lodger. The relief is being applied more widely as more people rent out rooms online. The relief also simplifies the tax and administrative burden for those with rent-a-room income up to £7,500. The limit is reduced by half if the income from letting accommodation in the same property is shared by a joint owner of the property.

The rent-a-room limit includes any amounts received for meals, goods and services provided, such as cleaning or laundry. If gross receipts are more than the limit, taxpayers can choose between paying tax on the actual profit (gross rents minus actual expenses and capital allowances) or the gross receipts (and any balancing charges) minus the allowance – with no deduction for expenses or capital allowances.

HMRC employment status service

HMRC’s employment status service can be used to help ascertain if a worker should be classified as employed or self-employed for tax purposes in both the private and public sector.

The service provides HMRC’s view as to whether IR35 legislation applies to a particular engagement and whether a worker should pay tax through PAYE as well as helping to determine if the off-payroll working in the public sector rules apply to a public sector engagement.

The software can be used to check the employment status of:

  • a worker providing services;
  • a person or organisation hiring a worker; or
  • an agency placing a worker.

HMRC has said that it will stand by the result given unless a compliance check finds the information provided was not accurate. HMRC will not stand by the results of contrived arrangements and those designed to get a particular outcome from the service. HMRC are clear that this would be treated as evidence of deliberate non-compliance and could result in higher penalties.

The service is anonymous, and the results are not stored online. However, the results can be printed and held for your own records. If any changes take place to the worker's role their status should be reassessed.

Update on Structures and Buildings Allowance

One of the Autumn Budget 2018 measures was the introduction of a new structures and buildings allowance (SBA). The SBA allows for tax relief on qualifying capital expenditure on new non-residential structures and buildings. The relief will therefore apply to the costs of building new commercial structures.

The relief was introduced with effect from 29 October 2018 and applies where all contracts for the physical construction works are entered into on or after that date. The relief is available at an annual rate of 2% on a straight-line basis (over 50 years). No relief will be available where parts of the structure qualify for other allowances, such as Plant & Machinery allowances.

A new policy paper has recently been published by HMRC and provides further details on the workings of this relief. The draft legislation necessary for the introduction of the SBA was laid before the House of Commons on 17 June 2019.

According to HMRC, the SBA will support business investment in constructing new structures and buildings including necessary preparatory costs, and the improvement of existing ones, as well as improving the international competitiveness of the UK’s capital allowances system.

Disguised remuneration schemes

Loans schemes also known as disguised remuneration tax avoidance schemes have been used by some employers and individuals in order to try and avoid paying Income Tax and National Insurance Contributions (NICs). This is usually done by utilising a loan or other payment from a third-party which is unlikely to be repaid. HMRC has never approved these schemes and has always said they will not be effective for tax avoidance purposes.

A charge (known as the 2019 loan charge) applies to all loans made since 6 April 1999 if they remained outstanding on 5 April 2019. The loan charge policy package is expected to raise £3.2 billion and it has been estimated that 75% of this will come from employers, and 25% from individuals.

HMRC had strongly encouraged disguised remuneration scheme users to come forward and provide all the required information to enable them to settle their tax affairs by 5 April 2019. Anyone who provided all the information needed to HMRC by 5 April 2019, can still settle their tax affairs under the November 2017 terms. HMRC will work to agree settlement in these cases so these users will not have to report and pay the loan charge. However, the settlement must be agreed by the date set out in HMRC’s offer letter, if not the loan charge will be payable.

There are simplified payment arrangements in some cases. For example, HMRC will allow scheme users to spread their payments over 7 years if their current taxable income is less than £30,000 and over 5 years if their current taxable income is less than £50,000. This offer only applies if the taxpayer is no longer engaged in tax avoidance and took sufficient action before 5 April 2019.

Claiming Entrepreneurs’ Relief when selling your business

Entrepreneurs' Relief (ER) can be a valuable relief when selling your business, your shares in a trading company or your interest in a trading partnership. Where ER is available Capital Gains Tax (CGT) of 10% is payable in place of the standard rate. CGT on the disposal of chargeable assets is usually chargeable at 20%. There are a number of qualifying conditions that must be met in order to qualify for Entrepreneurs' Relief.

There is a lifetime limit that means that you can qualify for ER more than once, subject to an overriding total limit of £10m of qualifying capital gains. There are time limits that must be met to make a claim. To qualify for relief you should be either an officer or employee of the company and own at least 5% of the company and have at least 5% of the voting rights. There are also other qualifying conditions that must be met in order to qualify for the relief.

In a recent change, the minimum period during which certain conditions must be met in order to qualify for ER increased from one to two years (from 6 April 2019). If you are looking to sell your business, you need to be mindful of meeting all the necessary conditions in order to qualify for ER.

There is also a sister relief called Investor’s relief which has a separate £10 million lifetime cap. This is useful for investors who do not meet the officer or employee requirement for ER.

Who should register for self assessment?

There are a number of reasons why a taxpayer is required to complete a self assessment return. This includes if they are self-employed, a company director, have an annual income over £100,000 and / or have income from savings, investment or property.

Taxpayers that need to complete a self assessment return for the first time should inform HMRC as soon as possible. The latest date that HMRC should be notified is by 5 October following the end of the tax year for which a self assessment return needs to be filed.

HMRC has an online tool that can help taxpayers ascertain whether they are required to submit a self assessment return.

The list of taxpayers that are likely to be required to submit a self assessment return includes:

  • The self-employed;
  • Taxpayers who had £2,500 or more in untaxed income;
  • Those with savings or investment income of £10,000 or more before tax;
  • Taxpayers who made profits from selling things like shares, a second home or other chargeable assets and need to pay Capital Gains Tax;
  • Company directors – unless it was for a non-profit organisation (such as a charity) and you didn’t receive any pay or benefits, like a company car;
  • Taxpayers whose income (or that of their partner’s) was over £50,000 and one of you claimed Child Benefit;
  • Taxpayers who had income from abroad for which they needed to pay tax;
  • Taxpayers who lived abroad and had a UK income;
  • Income over £100,000.

Readers who are concerned that they should, or should not be registered for self assessment are welcome to call; we can help you decide, one way or the other.

How ISAs work

An ISA is a tax exempt savings account available to UK residents. Whilst the amount invested in an ISA does not benefit from tax relief the income and gains are free from most taxes including Income Tax and Capital Gains Tax. Eligible holdings include cash ISAs, stocks and shares ISAs and innovative finance (including peer-to-peer loans) ISAs.

There is no minimum period for which an ISA must be held, and you can make withdrawals at any time without the loss of tax relief. The maximum amount that can be invested in an ISA in the current tax year is £20,000. The £20,000 limit can be used in one account or multiple accounts.

It is also possible for qualifying taxpayers to invest up to £4,000 of the £20,000 ISA limit in a Lifetime ISA. The Lifetime ISA is available to those aged between 18 and 40 to save for a new home or for their retirement. Under the scheme, the government provides a 25% bonus on yearly savings of up to £4,000 and once you start saving before you are 40, you can continue using the scheme until you turn 50. If you are approaching the age limit cut-off it is well worth opening a Lifetime ISA as you can continue saving until the day before you turn 50. The money invested in a Lifetime ISA can be used for purposes other than saving for a new home or retirement, but will be subject to a 25% withdrawal charge.

There are also Junior ISAs available for under 18’s which were introduced to encourage children to save money. The returns from Junior ISAs are also tax-free and are usually locked until the child reaches 18. The annual subscription limit for Junior ISAs is currently £4,368.

2020 May bank holiday will be moved to mark 75th anniversary of VE Day

The government has announced that the date of next year’s early May bank holiday is to move from Monday, 4 May to Friday, 8 May to mark the 75th anniversary of VE Day. This is only the second time ever that the early May bank holiday has been moved – the first was in 1995 to mark the 50th anniversary of VE Day. There will be commemorative events taking place across the country over the three-day weekend to honour the sacrifice made by men and women during the Second World War. VE Day was first celebrated on 8 May 1945 when Allied Forces formally accepted Germany’s surrender.


The early May bank holiday will move in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, where it is achieved by a Royal Proclamation made under the Banking and Financial Dealings Act 1971. Bank holidays are a devolved issue in Scotland. However, Scottish Ministers have also confirmed the change of date on the Scottish government’s website.

HMRC’s complaint handling process

Taxpayers may find themselves in a position where they need to make a complaint to HMRC. Complaints can relate to many different issues such as unreasonable delays, mistakes and poor treatment by HMRC’s staff. Note, there is a separate procedure to be followed by taxpayers that disagree with a decision of HMRC. In such cases the review and appeals process should be followed.

HMRC operates a formal two-tier complaints process.  Tier 1 is the first attempt to resolve a complaint and HMRC aims to resolve as many complaints as possible at this stage. Taxpayers that wish to make a complaint should in the first instance usually write or speak to the person or office they have been dealing with.

If the response is unsatisfactory, a further request can be made for the complaint to be looked at again by a different complaints handler who will take a second look at the complaint and then provide a final response. This is known as a Tier 2 complaint and is HMRC’s second and final review.

Taxpayers that are still unhappy with the response, can ask the Independent Adjudicator to look into the matter. The Adjudicator is completely independent of the HMRC. If they are unhappy with the Independent Adjudicator’s decision it is possible to contact the Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman via their MP.